Tag Archives: Venice

Venice, Bidar & Juna Mahal at risk

Entrance  to the Bidar Fort
Entrance to the Bidar Fort

Venice in Italy and a little-known Pokfulam Village in Hong Kong have one thing in common. Both are included in list of culturaal heritage sites at risk by World Monuments Fund (WMF). List also has places like the urban (Yangon Historic Center, Myanmar) and the remote (Gran Pajatén, in Peru); the ancient (Ancient Irrigated Terraces of Battir, in the Occupied Palestinian Territories) and the modern (the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in St. Louis, Missouri), all for diverse reasons including conflict and neglect. India has three of its sites included in the list, they are – Historic city of Bidar in Karnataka, Juna Mahal at Dungarpur in Rajasthan and house of Sufi saint Salim Chishti at Fatehpur Sikri, near Agra in Uttar Pradesh.

citadel of aleppo, syria
citadel of aleppo, syria

World Monuments Fund (WMF) announced the 2014 World Monuments Watch, presenting a diverse group of cultural heritage sites at risk from the forces of nature and the impact of social, political, and economic change. The 2014 Watch features 67 sites in 41 countries and territories ,dating from prehistory to the twentieth century.

Yangoon, Myanmar
Yangoon, Myanmar

The 2014 list reflects a number of distinct preservation challenges, including conflict and catastrophe, lack of resources, development pressures (urban, rural, tourism), and loss of cultural traditions . The 2014 Watch serves as a call to action, bringing the fragility of the sites and the dangers they face to international attention. It also identifies opportunities for local communities to work together with the larger preservation community, government organizations, corporate sponsors, and others to help ensure their future. For some sites, inclusion on the Watch presents the best hope for their survival.

Launched in 1996 and issued every two years, the World Monuments Watch calls international attention to threatened cultural heritage sites around the world. Watch-listing provides an opportunity for sites and their nominators to raise public awareness, foster local participation, advance innovation and collaboration, and demonstrate effective solutions.

St. louis arch, missouri
St. louis arch, missouri

The list is assembled by a panel of international heritage experts in the fields of archaeology, architecture, art history, and preservation. Since the program’s inception, more than 740 sites in 133 countries and territories have been included. The international attention given to Watch sites provides a vital tool with which local entities may leverage funding from a variety of sources, including municipal, regional, and national governments; foundations; corporate sponsors; international aid organizations; and private donors.

battersea power station, london, england
battersea power station, london, england

Since 1996, WMF has contributed $54 million, while almost $200 million has been allocated to the sites by other entities. The social impact of the Watch is also significant, especially through Watch Day, a component of the program established in 2012 that aims to reconnect communities to their heritage through public events.

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Venice tourists get shock bill

Caffè_LavenaTourists going to Venice beware – and make sure you read the fine print. Everyone knows the lagoon city can be expensive but seven tourists from Rome got a bitter surprise when their bill for four coffees and three liqueurs at an outdoor cafe topped 100 Euros ($130).

The scene of the mishap was the famed Caffe Lavena in St. Mark’s Square, where 19th century German composer Richard Wagner, who died in Venice in 1883, sat to have his morning coffee every day when he lived in the city. What the Roman tourists – who posted their receipt on Facebook – apparently did not notice when looking at the menu was the “music surcharge” of six Euros per person. It added up to 42 Euros, or nearly half of the bill.

The owners of the famous cafe, which opened in 1750 and where clients are served by white-jacketed waiters as a chamber orchestra plays, defended themselves. They said all the prices (six Euros for a coffee and 10 for a liqueur) as well as the music surcharge are printed on the menus. “If they found the prices too high, they could have got up and gone somewhere else, like many people do, or have the coffee standing at the bar inside, where it costs one euro,” Lavena’s manager, Massimo Milanese, told the Corriere della Sera newspaper. ($1 = 0.7490 Euros) – Reuters