Tag Archives: Himachal Pradesh

Where Whisky and Brandy are ferocious nallahs!


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I consider the stretch from Bharatpur to Pang to be the most eventful in the entire route from Manali to Leh. Eventful in the sense that it has got most fantastic variations in the landscape than any other stretch. Although Pang to Leh is also again a wonderful stretch but it is more of a leisure part and has less the challenges that Bharatpur-Pang stretch has to offer. That is precisely the reason that although I covered entire stretch from Bharatpur to Leh in a single day, but while writing about it, I have divided into two parts. That was only way to do some justice to it, as one single part would have been either too long or I would have to sacrifice some details.

Beautiful Landscape along the Tsarap Chu river

Bharatpur was an unscheduled halt for me because of the landslide an evening before. But it was always worth as is every inch of this mesmerising terrain.

Read also: Himalayan Rides – Lonely at mighty Baralacha La

Way from Bharatpur to Pang was to take me through same spot which was buried under huge landmass the last night. Just three kilometres ahead of that spot was Killing Sarai. One of the more fascinating things of this route is the nomenclature os the places on the way and as I had said earlier, perhaps army or BRO has big role in naming them. Killing Sarai actually has a BRO depot.

Starnge places, peculiar names

After Killing Sarai comes the Sarchu.  After Keylong Sarchu and Pang are the biggest transit camps on the way upto Upshi. Road upto Sarchu from Bharatpur is very testing.

Gorges along the way

But the early morning drive is very magical. You get to see the colours of nature like never before. You see, how the valley transforms, once it gets soaked in sunlight. First ray of light brings life to the region, life worth a gold literally.

Mountains of gold!

Sarchu gets lively on the sunrise and before reaching you get the feeling that you are close to an army transit camp.

Long way to go!
Truckers lined up at Sarchu

Sarchu is popular not just among campers but also among the truckers. You can find here many dhabas offering food as well as bed.  Although some old-timers had said to me that Pang is better place for a halt than Sarchu. Although Pang is higher in altitude, but Sarchu is more windy. I was to experience that on my way back.

Towards the army transit camp

Sarchu has a small army transit camp. I had come to know that this camp has a satellite phone and one can make calls from there by paying call charges. Fortunately I had been able to make calls every day on this route, it was quite a change from earlier times. I had earlier used BRO satellite phone at Batal as well. I didn’t stop at Sarchu but headed directly to the transit camp to make the call. After that, I moved ahead towards Gata Loops.

Also read: Himalayan Rides- Chacha-Chacha of Batal!

Amazing landscape
Road across the river

After crossing the Sarchu camps, road goes along the river and one has to cross the river and then travel opposite on the other side of the river to move ahead.

It is Brandy Nallah, but wrongly written Whisky here!

Brandy Nallah is at the base of the Gata Loops. Don’t get confused by the photo above as it is perhaps wrongly written by BRO on this board. I don’t know, how they changed the ‘drinks’! BRO perhaps can. I am still not able to comprehend the idea behind these fancy names. Brandy nallah has now got a new bridge, thus robing the adventure of traversing through flowing stream.

Also Read: Loops of the haunted!

Nakeela Pass at over 15,500 ft

Once you cross the Gata Loops, the climb doesn’t stop and actually we have to climb further for almost 10 kms upto the Nakeela Pass at an altitude of 15547 feet. This is the third pass after Rohtang La and Baralacha La en route from Manali to Leh. And these passes are constantly gaining height.

Also Read: Himalayan Rides – Manali to Gramphoo!

Whisky nallah is down there in the valley

Nakeela and Lachung La are two passes overlooking each other and there is a big valley in between. So after  crossing Nakeela we go downhill upto the Whisky Nallah and then climb again upto the Lachung La. Whisky nallah is still very tricky to cross especially in the early part of the season and upto late August. It can be troublesome during rains. But the place is yet tempting enough to have a camp or a restaurant or two.

Lachung La pass

At an altitude of 16616 feet Lachung La is fairly imposing but ride from Brandy Nallah to Nakeela and then Whisky La and Lachung La is quite decent. But things don’t remain always the same and hence the road changes dramatically after Lachung La.

Many such memorials on the way

Road obviously has all imprints of an BRO road including many small memorials for servicemen who lost their lives on this treacherous road either during any operation or while construction of roads. Road conditions might deteriorate but the beauty increases.

It used to be dreadful nallah

Pang is further 1400 feet downhill from Lachung La and hardly 14 kms but even this small stretch has lot to offer and Kangla Jal is indeed top of it. Like Brandy Nallah and Whisky Nallah, Kangla Jal has also go a fancy name with unknown history. But this too is one of the most challenging spots. I have seen images and videos of riders and drivers trying to negotiate the knee-deep waters of Kangla Jal in full flow. This also has got a new bridge now to make the ride smoother.

A biker crossing the Kangla Jal

This place makes a beautiful view on both sides- climb leading upto LachungLa on one side and slope leading upto the Pang on other.

A breathtaking view, literally!

View on other side of Kangla Jal is literally amazing… jaw dropping literally. You can feel amazed about the landscape as well as the engineering marvel of constructing roads and bridges here as in the image above.

Nature’s craft!

View keeps unfolding as you keep moving down towards Pang. Like the one above or like below…

As soon as we end this slope, we cross the bridge and enter the wide valley which houses Pang village.

Buses following me to Pang

Pang is another favourite camping site and a transit camp.

Looking behind towards Lachung La from Pang

Lot of construction is going on at Pang to construct new hotels and Dhabas. Few of them have been there for years like the one where I had my lunch..

Dhaba at Pang

At over 15,200 feet Pang is also said to be one of the highest army transit camps in the world.

Pang campsite

Valley broadens at Pang. Lower part houses the campsites, restaurants and dhabas while higher one houses the army transit camps. Again, the camp here has the facility of satellite phone, which can be used by adventurers to make emergency calls on payment of call charges, the are usually very nominal.

Pang is a must stop for all readers and drivers for a small break. And as I said earlier, it is also nice place for overnight stay.


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Coming next: More Plains and Tanglang La!

 

Loops of the haunted!


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Its is one of the India’s most popular ghost stories. I wouldn’t say that this story originates at most unlikely of the places, as it is one of the most wilderness of places you will come across. It can unnerve you and mesmerise you, both at the same time. But I will certainly say that I am interested in ghost stories only for sake of reading thrill, not at the point of believing them.

Those who have travelled to Leh from Manali by road will have certainly passed through Gata Loops and would have heard story about it. Now a days those who ride or drive on this road, do good research before hand and hence have a fairly good idea of the place. On Manali-Leh road, after you cross Sarchu, 24 kilometres later you come across a series of hairpin bends or loops popularly called as Gata Loops. These loops take you to a climb of almost 2000 ft upto Nakeela pass.

Also read: Lonely at mighty Baralacha La pass

Actually Gata Loops are to Manali-Leh road what Ka zigs are to Shimla-Kaza road. Both are nothing short of engineering marvels. Ka zigs raise from level of Spiti river to Nako through various hairpin bends. Similarly Gata Loops start at 4201 metres or 13,780 feet and 21 loops take you to altitude of 15,302 feet. Both these roads have been created out of nowhere to get human access via road to most improbable of places.

But these loops are also part of India’s most popular haunted stories. Those who have been to this place might be well aware of the hearsay. I am just briefing it for the sake of those, who haven’t heard about it.

Also read: Himalayan Rides- Chandratal to Keylong

This story is about a truck cleaner who died here a lonely death when the truck broke down in increment weather and the driver walked to nearby village to get some help. Cleaner waited at truck to guard the belongings. But it was late October (as per stories) and no vehicles were passing through as behind that truck the Rohtang Pass  (which provides vehicular accessories to Lahaul & Spiti valleys) was already closed down. Moreover snowfall had blocked all approach roads. Driver got stuck in the village for days. Hence the cleaner was left to fend for himself without an help, food or water which resulted in his demise. Stories say about his ghost still wondering around loops and begging for water to all passerby. Locals have constructed a makeshift temple where lies a human skull and believing the story people leave water bottles at the place.

But as always happens with the ghost stories, there are many versions and another version says about a tanker finding it difficult to climb the loop and driver asked its cleaner to get down and put some stones behind the wheels so as to stop it from rolling behind. But accidentally cleaner came under the wheels and seeing this driver ran away with the vehicle, leaving the cleaner behind left to die.

Nobody knows when these so-called incidents took place. Nowhere I have even read the name of that so-called village where driver went to get the help. There are no accounts to corroborate and it is surprising as by any means story would have been just a couple of decades old. Irony is, now there are hundreds of plastic water bottles scattered at that serene place.

I went biking almost end of the season on this route. I was pretty alone in the sense that I was biking solo and that particular time that stretch was devoid of any other vehicles. I captures whole climb of Gata Loops on video. But I was not able to see or capture anybody or any abnormal activity. Though interesting, it was hard for me to believe that story! I will tell you another thing, while returning back from Leh to Manali I crossed this particular stretch alone in pitch dark as I had decided to take the night halt at Sarchu instead of Pang. But still there was no ghost on the way.

Beautiful landscape around

Well, such stories might keep your travel interesting. But even without this story this particular stretch of road is quite fascinating for the views it gives while climbing up. I will say, it is actually a photographer’s delight to be here. You can just stop at every bend and keep clicking. Its amazing how the landscape changes as you climb, down from the river bed.

Reaching the top

As with every part of this route, it is quite different in different seasons. End of the season in late September or early October would be without any snow but different colours.

Gata Loops actually takes you to a different topography, once you are through, towards what Ladakh is actually famous for.

You can just forget all the ghosts and wonder at this nature’s marvellous creation.

What you see across is actually a view point

You can see a view point in the image above. It also works as a resting point for travellers after all the effort taken to climb the Gata Loops and enjoy some beauty, which they would have missed in all labour to climb up.

Interested in ghost stories? Read: Haunted Fort of Bhangarh- Nothing Spooky about it!

You can see the video of my Gata Loops ride on my channel by clicking on the link below-


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Lonely at mighty Baralacha La pass!


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It’s September. Seemingly best month to travel to Leh through this treacherous Manali-Leh highway. Best because of weather and the road conditions. Snow has melted around. But roadsides without snow also snatches away some of the thrills of this route, that one can experience in the months of June and July. But reaching here is never a mean task, more so if you have decided to travel all alone.

So, here I am at mighty Baralacha La pass, all alone. How it feels to be here standing lonely with not a living being in sight at an altitude more than half of the Mount Everest, with just your faithful bike to company!

Journey so far has been fascinating to say the least. At every step you keep feeling that how you have been longing to be here, inevitably. I already had a share of adventure on my detour to Chandratal.

Read:  Mesmerising & Captivating Chandratal Lake

But for those who all move straight towards Leh from Manali after crossing the Rohtang pass, its after Keylong that actual thrill starts.

Read:  Himalayan Rides – Chandratal to Keylong

Once you cross Keylong town, there is another small village Jispa on the way 20 kms from Keylong. Jispa is actually the last inhabited place before you reach Ladakh on this route. Though there are a few camping settlements and couple of transit camps also on the way. Jispa has also been traditionally popular among campers for first halt after Manali. Adventurers will prefer it over Keylong as Jispa is located along the banks of Bhaga river and is obviously more scenic than Keylong. Jispa also gives a high altitude acclimatisation as it is at an altitude of over 10,800 ft. As one of our fellow writers Ajay Jain from kunzum.com says that Jispa is more of a destination than just a halt on Manali-Leh highway. It Indeed is. You move ahead after crossing Darcha and reach Patsio. Darcha is more of a police check post where every vehicle has to make a entry before moving further ahead.

Camp site at Deepak Tal

Patsio is also fast emerging as a camping destination. It is higher at 12,300 ft and there is a small glacial lake named Deepak Tal.

Also read: Himalayan rides- Batal to Chandratal

Between Darcha and Patsio are few running streams which have to be crossed. One of them just before Patsio is particularly tricky one to negotiate as the flow of water is forceful and it doesn’t lets you judge the stones and pebbles correctly. So, though it is not deep, but crossing this on stones makes it tricky and as happened with me, I got struck in the middle of the stream. It took me a lot of effort to pull my bike out, and that particular moment I thought… is it foolish to be all alone here!

Further ahead, the next zing of the route is truly Zing Zing Bar. Another of pit stops. Benefit of going in September is also that, you get less number of streams to cross, otherwise Zing zing bar is famous for one of its ferocious nullahs. It is a refuelling depot for BRO vehicles, but also has some shacks, restaurants and a few camps. The name of the place is still a puzzle form me. But mind it, that many places enroute have been named by the army troops in all these years.

winding roads up towards Baralacha La

And then you reach Suraj Tal, just below the Baralacha La. Suraj Tal is quite below the road and it is not easy to reach there. You need time as you have to trek down upto the lake and then come again to continue with the journey. Not feasible for all those who are on thorough trip to next stop over. But those who stay at either Patsio or Zingzing Bar can afford to go upto Suraj Tal. For some strange reason army has renamed the Suraj Tal as Vishal Taal in memory of an young officer who died in this region.

What once used to be Suraj Tal has now been named as Vishal Taal by BRO. This high altitude Himalayan lake originates from #BaralachaLa. Although not as glamorous and big as Chandratal but still it is an important stop-over for all riders and bikers to Leh on the Manali-Leh highway. It is located just below the Baralacha La pass at an altitude of 4883 metres. This lake is further source of #Bhaga river which joins #Chandra river at #Tandi near #Keylong and form #Chandrabhaga river. Chandra River originates from Chandratal. Chandrabhaga becomes #Chenab river as soon as it enters Jammu and Kashmir from #HimachalPradesh There is also a very popular trekking route from Chandratal to Surajtal. This is how Suraj Tal looks in September. But it will be entirely different in early summer when there will still be lot of snow around. #travel #tourism #India #Leh #Manali #adventure #photography #photooftheday #picoftheday #MyPhotos #InstaPics #Lahaul #Spiti #SurajTal #VishalTaal #SurajTaal #Himalayas

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Occasional workers you encounter in the wilderness
Flags at Baralacha La

You can also watch a video of Baralacha La, Suraj Tal and Deepak Tal on my channel on YouTube by clicking the link below-

From Baralacha La the road goes down to a small settlement named Bharatpur. Roads and the weather are so unpredictable here that you never know, what happens next. What certainly is predictable is the beauty of landscape around. As we see in the images below.

‘Clay courts’ at Bharatpur
Towards Bharatpur

Not everything goes as per the plan though. When I had left in the morning from Keylong, target was to reach Sarchu and if possible Pang.  As happened with me when all of sudden after Bharatpur and just before Killing Sarai, I encountered a mighty landslide which forced an unscheduled night stopover at Bharatpur. A shack owner coming from the spot stopped me on the way and informed me about the incident. He also offered to come back and stay in his restaurant for the night. I still thought to see for myself and kept moving till the spot which was further one kilometre. Finally I could see it myself. That happened just a short while ago and workers already working on the road were miraculously saved. One of the JCB machine was buried under the rocks. I spent some time talking to the workers and photographing. I was told that there was no chance of clearing of the traffic before night. Bigger JCB machines were yet to arrive from Killing Sarai on the other side.

…and the landslide
Blocked road
miraculous escape for the workers

Turning back from the landslide, I reached back to the four shacks lined up side by side along the road. All of them were almost designed in similar fashion. Beds lined up on both sides in the front portion and then kitchen and store on the back. Makeshift pit toilets were on the back of the shack. River was further 50 metres behind.

evening at Bharatpur

Early close to the day gave me some time to roam around, enjoy the beauty, take photographs and also time to read, write and interact. As, soon the number of stranded vehicles had increased. It seemed that all the beds in all four shacks had already been booked up. That tiny camp site has been brought to life because of that landslide.

evening beauty at unscheduled halt

…blessing in disguise!

You can also see the video of this journey from Keylong to Bharatpur on my channel by clicking the link below-


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Himalayan Rides : Chandratal to Keylong

Having completed the Chandratal mission, I had to be back to Leh route. So, it had to be the same route back till Gramphoo. But in place like Himalayas, riding on a same route gives you different feeling every time. Chandratal indeed was an accomplishment, a sort of dream coming true. But still, Leh was my destiny.

Chaos at the top! Read: Milestones to Ladakh- Manali to Gramphoo

SO here we are, riding back to Gramphoo through same treacherous road alongside river Chandra. Whatever the road condition may be, this beauty around will never let you feel tired.

Driving towards Spiti! Read: Himalayan Rides-Gramphoo to Chatru

And what a feeling of satisfaction this is when you see a public transport, a Himachal Roadways Bus on such a terrible road at this altitude.

Treacherous roads! Read: Himalayan Rides-Chatru to Batal

And then you always have many travellers to your company… but no, we are the travellers, they are the inhabitants of this tough terrain…

 Reaching Gramphoo almost feels like returning to civilisation.You suddenly encounter traffic going towards the Manali or Keylong side.

Good samaritans! Read: Himalayan Rides-Batal of Chacha Chacha Dhaba

Himachal roadways bus at Gramphoo going from Keylong to Manali via Rohtang pass.

Gramphoo to Keylong is a straight forward route. But owing to widening or repair of roads, it has gone tough at many places, sort of dangerous at times.

Some relief from the tough roads

There are numerous landslide zones on the whole route and, at many places either roads are being widening or repaired to prevent landslides. This is a vicious circle, as widening causes further adverse impact on hills and the ecosystem. Well, for riders and drivers, they are immediate challenge as well.

Over the moon! Read: Himalayan Rides-Batal to Chandratal

Clouds were chasing me as soon as I had left Batal. They finally caught me up by the time I reached Khoksar. But since my final destination for the day, Keylong was not far away, hence instead of driving in rains, I decided to take a tea and maggi break.

Khoksar

Roads are largely good after Khoksar till Keylong, except for some rough patches.

Moon Lake! Read: Mesmerising & Captivating Chandratal Lake

Chandra River

Its a steady climb till Keylong which is at an altitude of just about 10K feet. A perfect acclimatisation for real ride after Keylong.

Give me some sunshine!

Before Keylong there are two another beautiful stopovers- one at Sissu which is now soon to get a water park close to Chandra River on the roadside.

And then there is Tandi, which is actually confluence of Chandra and Bhaga rivers which convert into Chandrabhaga or Chenab river and flow towards Kashmir. Tandi is 7 kilometres before Keylong and is also the last filling station before Leh. That’s the place where all vehicles will fill their tanks to reach Leh securely.

But overall an enjoyable ride, nevertheless. So lets go on this virtual ride to Keylong enroute Leh. You can watch the video of this ride from Chandratal to Keylong on my YouTube channel by clicking on the link below-

Quick details:

  • Chandratal to Gramphoo: 65 kms, Time taken 4 hours 40 minutes.
  • Gramphoo to Khoksar: 5 Kms
  • Khoksar ro Keylong: 47 kms, Time taken just about 2 hours.
  • Total distance covered: 117 kms.

We will now move to more challenging and more beautiful ride ahead. Keep tuned in!!

Please feel free to share the post, but not so free to copy and paste!!

 

 

Himalayan Rides : Batal to Chandratal

We are on a virtual ride to Lahaul & Spiti valley. Every rider or driver or adventurer enthusiast going to Leh or Kaza is very much keen to know about the road conditions on these arguably two of the most fascinating road journeys in the world.

Vast expanse of Chandra Valley is the glory of the region.

Its a journey, everybody would like to embark upon. So, here is a first hand experience of the trip, which I have broken down into different segments, or we may say shorter distances to give a more detailed overview of the trip.

Read: Milestones to Ladakh – Manali to Gramphoo

Tricky and challenging route

In the earlier parts of the journey, we have travelled from Manali to Gramphoo, then Gramphoo to Chatru and Chatru to Batal. Now after spending some time with Chacha-Chachi of Chandra Dhaba at Batal, we move towards Chandratal. Once we cross river Chandra after Batal, there is an uphill drive.

Read: Himalayan Rides – Gramphoo to Chatru

The road keeps opening fascinating new vistas

After a couple of kilometres, there is a diversion. Road uphill goest o Kunzum pass and then to Kaza. While road straight goes to Chandratal. Its is a pretty straight forward route after that along the Chandra river in the vast expanse of the valley.

Read: Himalayan Rides – Chatru to Batal

Himalayan views!

As we move deeper inside the valley, we go closer to Moulkila and Chandrabhaga mountain ranges. You can see, various peaks and glaciers as well. Its a paradise for shutterbugs.

Read: Himalayan Rides – Batal of Chacha-Chachi Dhaba

Views of glaciers around
Terrain typical of Spiti region

Its a beautiful journey but road condition is pretty much the same as has been from Chatru to Batal. Its a bumpy ride to say the least with a couple of running streams to cross. Flow of water in the streams will depend on the timing of the journey. Enjoyable journey upto the camping area near Chandratal lake. These streams look quite easy ones but pebbles below the water sometime make it tricky to maintain the balance of the luggage loaded bike. SO one has to be extremely careful.

In my last post on this trip, I had mentioned that how tough the terrain is and how hostile weather can be here. With the interiors of valley difficult to reach, it makes the rescue operations in any event of crisis very challenging. Hence there is also a helipad and control station after Batal on way to Chandratal. But this one is across the Chandra river on other side.

Helipad and satellite relay station

You can watch the video of this road journey on clicking the link below: 

Big flat valley provides an ample space for camping. First couple of camps actually are half a kilometre before the main camping site. Main camping site is right on the base of the uphill route towards Chandratal Lake.

Read: Mesmerising & Captivating Chandratal Lake

Camping at an altitude of around 4200 metres is a fascinating experience.

My bike right next to my tent

Till some years back, camping site near Chandratal Lake had just one camp. Now there are many camps and more than 150 tents for adventurers to stay. They are run by different local operators though.

Main camping site for Chandratal Lake
It is almost end of the season for the Tenzin camp
Another look of the camping site and surrounding areas

Tents are good, clean, cosy and with various size options. Operators also provide meals and breakfast. Most of the prices of the tents include stay with meals (generally breakfast and dinner).

You can watch the video of this camping site on clicking the link below:

This place is culmination for many treks as well as base camp for many expeditions to nearby peaks. Adventurers mostly come here to see Chandratal Lake. Many bikers will just visit the lake and then move ahead towards Kaza or Manali. I stayed here overnight in Tenzin camp and made two visits to lake- one in the afternoon and another in early next morning. If you stay here overnight, than you can also enjoy beautiful sunrise here in the morning, like this one-

CB13 and CB14 peaks of the Chandrabhaga range basking in glory
Closer look of first rays of sun on CB14 (6078 mts) peak

Both these peaks are favourite among mountaineers seeking an experience of 6000 metre climb. These expeditions are also done from the Batal.

Another view of campsite with CB13 & CB14 in background.

Having covered Chandratal Lake, now we will turn back on the same way upto Gramphoo and from there turn towards Keylong on way to Leh.

Hope, this part of the journey was enjoyable.

Fabulous property, excellent location : Norbu House, Mcleodganj

Best thing about places like McLeodganj is that, distances seem longer in the map than they actually are. Although being a hill station there are some slopes and ascends, but then that’s what you have come here for. It took hardly five minutes of us to reach the Hotel Norbu House in taxi from the McLeodganj bus stand, but if you travel light than you can easily walk down, if indeed you love walking. It has a small place to park vehicles though, and in place like McLeodganj it often seems like a bonus as most hotels in the market area won’t have a parking at all and one would have to use public parking place near bus stand.

Reception area of the Hotel Norbu House reflects Tibetan culture

I had been to Mcleodganj earlier. This time search for a different stay landed us to Hotel Norbu House. Online posts and reviews made me the admirer of the property. And actual visit and subsequent stay did nothing to disappoint in any manner. Its a charming hotel with mix of modernity and tradition. We had reached here quite early because our bus from Delhi has a scheduled early morning arrival. Hotel staff was quite courteous and responsive to allow us an early check-in and our room was ready by the time we had a lemon-honey-ginger tea at the beautiful terrace restaurant. It is said to be one of the most beautiful terrace restaurant in Mcleodganj. Room was spacious and clean.

Terrace area right outside the restaurant can be used as place for dining or just relaxing and reading while enjoying the terrific views

This hotel is actually a family owned property who earlier had a Green Hotel in the main market on Bhagsu Temple road. That Green Hotel was one of the earliest properties in town. Now the Green Hotel is more of budget hotel and Norbu House is a bit niche. I had hear a lot about the owner Mr Wagdu and the way he takes care of each and every guest himself so lovingly.  I wanted to meet him, but he was away those days.

Splendid view of sprawling Kangra valley from the terrace of the Hotel Norbu House
Stars descend in the valley. That’s how the night looks like from the terrace of Hotel Norbu House

One of the prime attraction of hotel is its location, which is quite close to market and on the top of ridge right opposite to Dalai Lama temple. Easily approachable and what stumps you is the view of the valley that it commands. The lobby and the restaurant area through its design and decoration makes you feel that you are in Dalai Lama’s city with glimpse of Tibetan culture and traditions.

Restaurant of the Hotel Norbu House. You can have meals here or outside at the terrace. Buffet breakfast is also served here.

Hotel provides a buffet breakfast and it was quite delicious. Even the meal options were good but a bit on higher side of price range in comparison to options available in the market. So, not a budget hotel but look for some deals online to get best prices as this is one of the top places worth staying in Mcleodganj. You can also enjoy some Tibetan delicacies here.

A conference room that can be multi-purpose hall

Hotel has rooms in different categories- suites, luxury rooms and the executive rooms. It also has a conference room.  Hotel is build along the ridge in six floors. Reception area is actually on the third floor. There is a lift along with the stairs. Lift goes up from the terrace side and is made of glass to let you enjoy the panoramic views of the valley while going up or down.

Bedroom in one of the suites of Hotel Norbu House
Living area in one of the suites of the Hotel Norbu House

Suites and the Luxury rooms on the lower floors have common terrace in from of the rooms with a full valley view and ample sitting and relaxing area. While rooms on the upper floor have balcony attached to the room. Dhauladhar ranges are right behind the hotel and you can also have a glance of snow-peaked mountains from the terrace or balcony.

Terrace on the upper floor along with balconies for rooms
Common terrace for another floor in front of set of rooms
Terrace in the front of the suites and luxury rooms

There is also a nunnery inside the hotel complex. This hotel is also favourite among those who come here either for meditation or some spiritual time. Hotel provides a free wifi facility. Rooms have all type of amenities and facilities. Hotel might not look impressive from outside (although there is hardly any face of the hotel that you can see), but it is as comfortable as it can be, once you enter. Certainly worth a try, if your budget permits.

Mcleodganj

Mcleodganj is best know as the headquarters of the Dalai Lama’s Tibetan government in exile. There is Dalai Lama temple here and also his residence. Although he travels so much around the world that his being in Mcleodganj is treated as a big occasion. Dalai Lama temple is on walking distance from Hotel Norbu House. Mcleodganj is also know for Bhagsu falls and Bhagsunag temple. Mcleodganj is also base for many trekking expeditions in the Dhauladhar ranges of Himalayas including the very famous weekend trek to Triund.

Please Read: Triund in the shadow of the Indrahar Pass

How to Reach:

Mcleodganj is eight kilometres further ahead of Dharamshala. Dharamshala-Mcleodganj are well connected by road to nearest railheads- Kangra (for narrow gauge on Pathankot-Jogindernagar line) and Pathankot (for broad gauge on Delhi-Jammu line).  Kangra is 20 kms and Pathankot is 90 kms from Dharamshala. Dharamshala has an airport at Gaggal, which is 12 kms from the city. Major cities in North like Delhi, Chandigarh, Amritsar or Shimla have overnight luxury bus services to Dharamshala-Mcleoadganj.

Entrance to the Hotel Norbu House

Triund in the shadow of the Indrahar Pass

Dhauladhar ranges act like a natural wall for sprawling Kangra valley. This Himalayan range creates the beauty as well as weather for the region. Trekking here is an adventurous experience. Almost a decade ago, when I was here last time for the Triund trek, our intention was to spend the night at the top. That whole night there was almost nobody on the top, besides a group of foreign trekkers who had put up their tents on one side of the hill. We didn’t carry a tent and the forest department rest house was closed, and we had a tough time to arrange for a shelter for night. That night it rained very ferociously keeping us panicked and anxious whole night.

Though it is not a very old story, but it looked like so when I was there again, some days back. More so, because, everything around looks so changed except of course the beauty of the Indrahar Pass, which was still intact. Actually it looked more beautiful this time around weather was perfect, sky blue and the Dhauladhar ranges were covered with snow. On the Triund hill, there might be at least two hundred tents and more than 500 trekkers this time around. Although weather was clear, but it was still quite cold in the night. Even if weather would have deteriorated a bit, there was ample place to accommodate everybody. No problem of food as well, because there were fair number of small dhabas who were serving light hot breakfast as well as meals for those who wanted.

Another thing, what I enjoyed this time around was the hill ladder with red-pink rhododendron flowers. Actually this has been one of the big attractions for me to do some treks of medium altitudes during the late spring.

Trek route and rhododendron flowers

From March till May, whole of lower Himalayas around altitude of 8 to 10 thousand feet gets covered with rhododendron flowers. These flowers change the colour of the hills, as if adorning them with red jewels. In the hills of Himachal and Uttarakhand, we will normally find red or pink rhododendrons. As you move towards Sikkim, they get many more colours. Trekking in hills coloured with floral beauty is a magical experience and Triund gives ample of that.

In recent years, Triund has gained immense popularity as a short and easy trek. It is one of the top weekend treks for the adventure loving youth of nearby Delhi, Punjab, Rajasthan, Himachal and Haryana, etc.

Trekkers having some rest and food at a cafe enroute

Triund hill is located in Kangra valley of Himachal Pradesh. Dhauladhar range form the southern part of outer main Himalayas. When we go to Dharamshala or Mcleodganj than Dhuladhar ranges look just like a high wall in the backyard. These ranges actually start from Kangra valley and the mountains rise all of a sudden in the vast valley. From here this range extends upto Kullu along the Beas river. These ranges cover almost whole of Himachal Pradesh and the peaks here actually form a border between Kangra and Chamba districts of Himachal Pradesh. Kangra valley lies in the North-west and Chamba towards the east. You can do the peaks in these ranges, either from Mcleodganj side or the Chamba side.

Majestic view of Kangra valley from Triund hill

Triund is 10 kms from Mcleodganj and 18 kms from Dhramshala at an altitude of 2975 mtrs. Triund lies at the feet of the perpetually snow clad Dhauladhar range. It also forms the base for #trek to #Indrahar Pass via Lahesh Cave. After crossing Indrahar Pass, you can go down towards Chamba side. A moderate and enjoyable trek worth a trip in summers as well as in winters. The snow line starts at Ilaqa (3350 mtr), 5km from Triund. To have a rough idea about altitude- Dharamshala is at an altitude of 1400 metres and Mcleodganj is further up at almost 2000 metres. From there you trek upto 2900 metres for Triund top. Highest peak in Dhauladhar range is Hanuman Ka Tibba which has an altitude of 5600 metres.

Indrahar Pass as seen from Triund

Trek: Starting point of the trek to Triund depends upon your place of stay in and around Mcleodganj. Many people, mostly foreign trekkers will start the trek from there hotel itself. But the last road-head is ahead of Dharamkot at Gulu temple. Tracks from Rawa, Dal Lake, Dharamkot and Bhagsunag- all meet at this temple (alt: 2130 metres). Many people will take a taxi to reach temple and then start the trek. From here, trek is just around six and half kilometres to the top. Those who start from Bhagsunag or Dharamkot, trek for them will be more than nine kilometres. This temple has a shrine, a water point, a cafe and other shops.

Trek is easy to moderate and only at few points it rises abruptly. There is a well-laid mud trek till the top. There are many shops all along the trek serving hot and cold drinks, snacks and refreshments. At some places where trek passes through steep edges and falls, fencing has also been put to make it more safe for revellers, although  it robes the trek of its beauty and adventure a bit. Its a beautiful route anyway, passing through pines, deodars, rhododendrons and more. Travel time to top depends on your speed and stamina. But then, why to hurry! Enjoy the nature around you and take your time. Even if you take it easy, you can reach to top in four to five hours from Gulu temple.

Stay at top: If you have arranged for the trek through a package with a tour operator, then it would obviously arrange for your tent stay and food at the top. But if you are going on your own, then you need to explore the stay options at the top. If you are carrying your tents, then there is enough space to pitch them. Triund has just one well constructed forest department rest house, which needs a pre-booking. Otherwise, there are many shops on the top. All of these shops have tents for the trekkers. They pitch them as required. You can stay there as well as have food. But Triund has scarcity of water, do keep that in mind.

There are many trekkers who will start early from Mcleodganj, reach  at top by lunch time and after spending some hours there, will return  to reach down before it gets dark. But those who have time, will stay there overnight. Some of them will also try to go to snowline early next morning and come back to the Triund by the brunch time and then start the descend. It is quite relaxing at the top in the evening.

You can have some lovely view of sunset from the Triund top, just like this one-

Sunset at Triund top

Or you can also try your luck in spotting some wild life. Monals and wild goats are frequent visitors around the hill, mostly in the evening  or early morning.

A beautiful looking monal at a distance

Getting down: Mostly people will take the same route to come back.  But there is another way along the ridge that takes you down. This route is smaller but bit tough and quite steep. This brings you right on the top of the Bhagsu falls.

Steep descend along the ridge

While coming down this way, we found some trekkers going up this way. Many locals and foreigners take this way to the top, as it is shorter and without and chaos of trekking-tourists. But this route needs lot of stamina as it is a very steep climb in comparison to regular trekking route. Moreover, you won’t find any shop on this way. So one needs to prepare accordingly.

Tips:

  • You need to reach Dharamshala or Mcleodganj to start for the trek.
  • Dharamshala-Mcleodganj are well connected by road to nearest railheads- Kangra (for narrow gauge on Pathankot-Jogindernagar line) and Pathankot (for broad gauge on Delhi-Jammu line).  Kangra is 20 kms and Pathankot is 90 kms from Dharamshala. Dharamshala has an airport at Gaggal, which is 12 kms from the city. Major cities in North like Delhi, Chandigarh, Amritsar or Shimla have overnight luxury bus services to Dharamshala-Mcleoadganj.
  • If you just want to do the Triund trek, than it is better to stay at Mcleodganj. You have enough hotels to suit every pocket.